Cosmic Connection Meteorites

Hunting, Collecting, and Trading Cosmic Related Rarities Since 1998

Park Forest fell on March 26, 2003.

This was my first witnessed fall hunt. Unfortunately I've lost almost all my photo's from the 2 trips I made. You can read more about the Park Forest event in the Meteoritical bulletin report below.

 

A 638 gram Park Forest found by my brother Richard Atkins on March 29, 2003.

Photo Larry Atkins

Photo Larry Atkins

When Richard found the meteorite there was nothing more than a small hole punched into the grass. It's amazing that he saw it. In this image we have dug out the stone and Rich has put his hand in for depth reference. The top of the meteorite was about 6 inches below the surface. This image appeared in the July, 2003 edition of 'Sky and Telescope" magazine

Photo Larry Atkins

Photo Larry Atkins

This is a 70 gram "Hammer Stone". Not only did it hit a Maple tree, ricochet and land on a welcome mat, but then it was immediately picked up and brought into the house. This is important because shortly after the fall of these stones there was a big rain. All stones were subjected to the rain except a very, very few. In this image you can see the metal shining in the matrix.

Photo Larry Atkins

Photo Larry Atkins

 

Photo Larry Atkins

Photo Larry Atkins

Through the years the tree bark has slowly fallen off. Remnants can still be seen here.

Photo Larry Atkins

Photo Larry Atkins

Park Forest

Basic informationName: Park Forest
     This is an OFFICIAL meteorite name.
Abbreviation: There is no official abbreviation for this meteorite. 
Observed fall: Yes
Year fell: 2003
Country: United States
Mass: 18 kg

Classification
  history:

Meteoritical Bulletin:  MB 87  (2003)  L5

MetBase:  v. 7.1  (2006)  L5

Recommended:  L5    [explanation]


This is 1 of 5882 approved meteorites (plus 1 unapproved name) classified as L5.   [show all]
Search for other: L chondrites (type 4-7)Ordinary chondrites (type 4-7)L chondrites, and Ordinary chondrites
WriteupWriteup from MB 87: 

Park Forest

Cook County, Illinois, USA

Fell 2003 March 26, approx. 23:50 hrs local time

Ordinary chondrite (L5)

A bright fireball was seen by numerous observers in parts of Illinois, Indiana, Wisconsin and Ohio around midnight of March 26, 2003. Numerous stones fell, mostly concentrated in the area of the village of Park Forest. At least two houses in Park Forest were struck, as was the Fire Station. Dozens of other stones or fragments of stones were recovered in the area in the hours and days following the fall. Total mass recovered is more than 18 kg, largest stone ~3 kg in possession of finder. Description and classification (S. Simon, UChi; M. Wadhwa, FMNH; P. Sipiera, PSF): Most stones are partly to fully fusion-crusted. Some broken faces show brecciated texture, angular clasts. Cross-cutting dark veins and dark pockets may be of impact melt origin. No visible chondrules in hand sample. Abundant troilite and metal visible in some broken faces. Chondrules and maskelynite are visible in thin section. Mean olivine composition Fa24.7, mean low-Ca pyroxene Fs20.7Wo1.6. Shock stage S5. Specimens: type specimen 515 g (hit fire station), FMNH. Other stones at FMNH: 1200 g, 529 g, 183 g, 159 g, 125 g.

Institutions
   and collectionsFMNH: Department of Geology The Field Museum of Natural History 1400 South Lake Shore Drive Chicago, IL 60605-2496, USA, United States; Website (institutional address; updated 16 Nov 2011)
PSF: Planetary Studies Foundation,10 Winterwood Lane, Unit B, Galena, Illinois 61036-9283, United States; Website (institutional address; updated 1 Dec 2011)
UChi: University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, United States (institutional address; updated 28 Feb 2011)

Catalogs:Search for specimens in the Smithsonian Institution collection (U.S.):   

     Require SI photo

Search for this meteorite in the Natural History Museum collection (U.K.):   

     Require NHM photo

References:Published in Meteoritical Bulletin, no. 87, MAPS 38, A189-A248 (2003)

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